2017 Honda Accord

Starting MSRP: $22,355 - $34,830

Estimated MPG: 23 city / 32 hwy

2017 Honda Accord Review

A roomy cabin and a polished driving experience make the 2017 Honda Accord a top choice among family cars, but those attributes only scratch the surface. The Accord’s cutting-edge infotainment features should please tech-savvy buyers, while great safety ratings and an affordably priced driver assistance package provide peace of mind.

By Jim Sharifi
Last Updated 04/03/2017

The Accord is a midsize car that’s offered in coupe and sedan body styles. The Honda Accord Hybrid is also offered, and it's covered in a separate review. A four-cylinder engine and a six-speed manual transmission are standard on the Accord, while a continuously variable transmission (CVT) is available. A V6 engine is optional and is paired exclusively with a six-speed automatic in the Accord sedan. The Accord coupe offers this power plant with the automatic or a six-speed manual transmission.

For 2017, the Accord sedan is offered in LX, Sport, Sport SE, EX, EX-L and Touring trims, while the Accord coupe is available in LX-S, EX, EX-L and Touring editions. The Sport SE trim is new for 2017. It builds on the Accord Sport’s list of standard equipment with features that include leather upholstery with contrast stitching and heated front seats.

Exterior

Exterior
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Among midsize cars, the Accord stands out as one of the few models that’s offered in coupe and sedan body styles. Both models have a similar appearance when viewed head-on, where slim headlights flank a narrow upper grille. The biggest difference is in their profiles, where the coupe’s gradually sloping roofline gives it an almost hatchback-like stance. Coupe and sedan base models come standard with automatic projector-beam headlights, while LED headlights and fog lights are found on higher trims.

From the sides, the Accord sedan reveals a rising beltline, and a relatively long hood and a short rear overhang add a hint of sport to its attractive but conservatively styled profile. Sixteen-inch alloy wheels come standard on the sedan (17- and 19-inch wheels are optional), and 17-inch wheels are standard on the coupe (18- and 19-inch wheels are optional). We particularly like the look of our test Accord Touring’s 19-inch wheels, which featured an attractive split five-spoke design with black accents.

All models come with LED taillights, body-colored power-adjustable side mirrors and chrome exterior door handles. Heated sideview mirrors with integrated turn signal indicators, a power moonroof and a body-colored rear spoiler are among the Accord’s available exterior features.

Interior

Interior
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Spacious and attractively styled, the Accord’s interior should meet the requirements of just about any buyer looking for a family sedan. Like the Volkswagen Passat, the Accord features interior materials that are impressive for the class, but the design is a bit more contemporary. Padded surfaces cover just about every touch point, while higher trims benefit from a dual-screen infotainment system that dominates the center stack.

The Accord sedan offers a useful 15.8 cubic feet of trunk space, while the coupe has up to 13.7 cubic feet of cargo capacity. Our Accord sedan featured ample head- and legroom in both rows. We thought the front seats could use a bit more bolstering, but we suspect that buyers with just about any body type will find the front row comfortable, even if it could be a bit more supportive.

The base Accord comes with cloth upholstery, dual-zone automatic climate control and a fold-down rear seat. Higher trims offer leather upholstery, heated front seats, power-adjustable front seats, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. Sedans are available with a 60/40-split folding rear seat for additional cargo-carrying versatility.

Performance

Performance
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Among midsize cars, the Accord stands out for its level of refinement. It’s not quite as athletic as competitors like the Mazda6 or Ford Fusion, but the Accord does a commendable job of balancing forgiving ride quality with composed handling. The result is a controlled and comfortable driving experience that’s also fun enough to satisfy most buyers.

Base Accord sedans and coupes come with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that provides 185 horsepower and 181 pound-feet of torque. That engine is mated to a six-speed manual transmission or an available CVT. Accord Sport and Sport SE sedans have the same engine, but they offer a bit more output with 189 horsepower and 182 pound-feet of torque.

Our test Accord sedan featured a 3.5-liter V6 engine that becomes available at the EX-L trim level on both sedans and coupes. It offers 278 horsepower and 252 pound-feet of torque, and it's mated with a six-speed automatic transmission. (V6-powered Accord coupes are also offered with a six-speed manual transmission.)

We found the Accord’s powertrain to be smooth and responsive in every situation during our week of driving. While the V6-powered Toyota Camry we tested felt a little quicker off the line, our Accord Touring’s engine seemed polished enough to reside under the hood of a luxury car. Power comes on in a linear and predictable fashion, and switching to the available Sport mode can provide more immediate responses when needed.

The EPA reports that the base Accord sedan gets 23/32 mpg city/highway with the six-speed manual transmission, or 27/36 mpg with the CVT. Models like our V6-powered Accord Touring are rated at 21/33 mpg.

Technology

Technology
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The base Accord comes standard with an audio system (four speakers in sedans and six speakers in coupes), Bluetooth connectivity, hands-free text messaging, a USB port, Pandora smartphone app integration and a 7.7-inch display. Accord EX and higher trims gain an additional 7-inch touch screen, as well as Apple CarPlay/Android Auto integration, satellite radio and HD radio. Features like an upgraded audio system, satellite-linked navigation and keyless entry/ignition are also offered.

Our test Accord came with the dual-display setup that includes the lower 7-inch touch screen. It’s a user-friendly setup in general, with quick response times and intuitive menus. Still, the lack of familiar controls like a volume knob may be a detractor for some buyers. We consider it a minor issue, since straightforward steering-wheel-mounted controls make it easy to access most primary functions.

Lower trims lack the latest smartphone mirroring technologies, but they provide a more straightforward audio system with conventional buttons and knobs.

Safety

Safety
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The 2017 Honda Accord comes standard with a rearview camera. Forward collision warning, lane departure warning, lane keeping assist and adaptive cruise control are optional at every trim level except the top Touring trim, where they’re included as standard equipment.

Blind spot monitoring is not offered, but EX, EX-L and Touring sedans and EX-L and Touring coupes come with the Honda LaneWatch system. When the right turn signal is activated, LaneWatch uses a camera to provide a view of potential blind spots on the passenger side.

In crash tests conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the 2017 Accord earned a top five-star rating for its overall performance.

Testing conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) resulted in top scores of Good in all crashworthiness categories and a Top Safety Pick+ designation. Certain Accord trims also received the second-highest Acceptable rating in IIHS headlight tests, while models with forward collision warning earned a top Superior score for front crash prevention.

Cost-Effectiveness

Cost-Effectiveness
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The base Accord LX starts at $22,455 plus an $875 destination charge, while a comparable Accord LX-S coupe starts at $24,125. Both prices reflect models with a six-speed manual transmission. The CVT is an $800 option on most lower sedan trims ($850 on coupes). It becomes standard equipment on the Accord EX-L. EX-L coupes start at $29,095, while EX-L sedans begin at $28,920.

The availability of a manual transmission may be a boon for enthusiasts shopping in this segment, but most competitors come standard with an automatic, including lower-priced rivals like the Hyundai Sonata.

Our fully loaded Accord Touring carried a suggested price of $35,665, including destination. It came standard with the more powerful V6 engine, as well as every tech and driver assistance feature that is currently offered in the Accord lineup.

We think most sedan buyers will find the best value with the Accord EX, which starts at $25,830. That model offers the choice of a CVT or a six-speed manual, and it comes standard with Apple CarPlay/Android Auto smartphone integration. The Honda Sensing suite of driver assistance features is available on every trim, and we’d spend the additional $1,000 it costs to get adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning and lane departure warning. Expect an Accord EX sedan with a CVT and these features to carry a suggested price of $28,505, including destination.

Overall

Overall
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The Accord was last redesigned in 2013, but Honda has done an admirable job of keeping its midsize car up-to-date. An impressive suite of tech features includes the latest smartphone mirroring technologies, and Honda has made its suite of driver assistance features an affordable option on every trim. These qualities only enhance the Accord’s core attributes, which include refined performance, impressive crash test scores and a roomy, high-quality interior.