Chevrolet S-10

Chevrolet S-10

The Chevrolet S-10 is a compact pickup truck that was introduced in 1982 and built through 2004. This truck, along with the similar GMC S-15, replaced the earlier Chevrolet LUV. The S-10 itself was followed by the Chevrolet Colorado in 2005.

Chevrolet S-10 Overview

Following a decade of relying upon Isuzu to supply it with a small pickup truck, General Motors launched the Chevrolet S-10 and the GMC S-15. Upon introduction, the Chevrolet S-10 was offered as a regular cab model. An extended cab model and an available four-wheel drive system followed in 1983.

Initially, the Chevrolet S-10 was powered by an Isuzu-supplied 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. Chevrolet also offered a 2.8-liter V6 engine. Both engines were paired with either a four-speed manual or a three-speed automatic transmission. Both short- and long-bed versions were available with payloads ranging from 1,000 to 1,500 pounds.

In addition to adding an extended cab model for 1983, Chevrolet brought in two new engines. A 2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine and an Isuzu-supplied 2.2-liter diesel engine were available. Separately, an SUV variant made its debut, the Chevrolet S-10 Blazer.

Changes throughout the first-generation run included adding heavy-duty and off-road suspensions for 1984 and replacing the 2.0-liter four-cylinder gasoline engine with a 2.5-liter four cylinder for 1985. For 1986, the two Isuzu-supplied engines were discontinued, and the V6 gained throttle body injection. Two years later, a 4.3-liter V6 engine was added and paired with a four-speed automatic transmission.

Antilock brakes were made available for 1989 and a digital instrument panel was introduced. Beginning in 1992, an electronic shift transfer case became an option on four-wheel drive models.

The second-generation Chevrolet S-10 made its debut for 1994 and came with a new base engine: a 2.2-liter four cylinder. This engine came paired with a five-speed manual or a four-speed automatic transmission. The 4.3-liter V6 was updated and offered the same transmission pairings. Regular and extended cab models were offered with short- and long-bed choices.

An SS version also was produced, debuting for 1994. This model was available through 1998 and featured a high-output version of the V6 engine. It also came with a sport suspension and alloy wheels. That year, a ZR2 package was also introduced, bringing in large off-road tires, a modified suspension and standard four-wheel drive.

For 1996, a stepside cargo box arrived, and extended cab models received third-door access on the driver's side. The S-10 was refreshed for 1998, receiving a new front fascia and an updated interior with dual air bags. For 1999, the sporty Xtreme package was released. Available only with rear-wheel drive, this version of the S-10 sits 2 inches lower to the ground than the standard truck.

Beginning with the 2001 model year, Chevrolet added a crew cab model, providing room for up to five. The S-10 was discontinued following the 2004 model year and replaced by the Chevrolet Colorado. The Toyota Tacoma, Nissan Frontier, Dodge Dakota and Honda Ridgeline might be cross-shopped alongside the S-10.