Chevrolet Cobalt

Chevrolet Cobalt

The Chevrolet Cobalt is a compact car that was originally offered in sedan and coupe body styles. Supercharged versions were also offered, and eventually replaced by a turbocharged model.

Chevrolet Cobalt Overview

The Chevrolet Cobalt was introduced in 2005 and built through 2010. This model replaced the Chevrolet Cavalier and was itself replaced by the Cruze. Buyers considering the Cobalt might also explore the nearly identical Pontiac G5, which was built from 2007 to 2009.

Initially, Cobalt coupe models were sold in base, LS and SS trims, while sedans were offered in base, LS and LT trims. All Cobalt models except for the base edition came with antilock brakes and offered General Motors’ OnStar telematics system.

Upon its debut, the 2005 Chevrolet Cobalt was powered by 145-horsepower, 2.2-liter four-cylinder engine. A five-speed manual transmission and a four-speed automatic were offered.

A supercharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine was also offered and paired with a five-speed manual transmission. This engine offers 205 horsepower, and it initially powered the Cobalt SS coupe.

Beginning in 2006, Chevrolet introduced a 171-horsepower, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine for the Cobalt SS, which was now offered as a coupe or a sedan. The previous year’s supercharged four-cylinder was still available, and offered in the Cobalt SS Supercharged coupe.

For 2007, the Cobalt's 2.2-liter engine was retuned, and its rating was upped to 148 horsepower. That year also saw the rollout of a new audio system, new wheel packages and a new steering wheel.

Chevrolet replaced the Cobalt SS coupe's supercharger with a turbocharger for 2008, boosting performance to 260 horsepower. That model year also saw some trim shuffling. The SS coupe and SS sedan were renamed the Sport Coupe and the Sport Sedan, respectively. Previously optional equipment, such as satellite radio and side impact air bags, was now standard on all models. A new stability control system was also introduced.

For 2009, the Sport Coupe and Sport Sedan models were eliminated, along with the 2.4-liter engine powering them. An upgraded 2.2-liter engine was introduced and the OnStar telematics system was made standard across the model line. Bluetooth and USB connectivity were also made available.

Numerous small cars compete with the Chevrolet Cobalt, including the Toyota Corolla, Ford Focus, Honda Civic, Mazda3, Subaru Impreza, Nissan Sentra, Volkswagen Jetta, Hyundai Elantra and Kia Forte.

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